Archive | Harvest 2015

Photo by Trisha Hughes

Spicy Carrots, Parsnips and Sweet Potatoes

Photo by Trisha Hughes

Yield: 4 servings

2 pounds sweet potatoes
6 medium parsnips, about 6 inches in length
6 medium carrots, about 6 inches in length
1 teaspoon kosher salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

Preheat oven to 400°. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or coat with nonstick spray.

Peel potatoes, parsnips and carrots or scrub thoroughly if leaving skins on. Cut vegetables to be uniform in size, approximately 2-inch-thick pieces.

Place the vegetables into a large bowl and add ¼ cup oil, tossing to coat. Add salt, pepper and cayenne pepper and mix thoroughly adding additional oil as needed to coat vegetables.

Spread mixture onto prepared baking sheet.

Bake for 50 to 60 minutes until edges are brown and vegetables are fork-tender.

Recipe developed for Edible Omaha by Julie Kolpin and Mary Oswald.

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Chad’s trusty sidekick has been with him through thick and thin, summer sausage and prosciutto. Chad’s inability to find quality cured meat while living in Madagascar is what sparked his interest in trying it on his own.

Bacon Man

Tuscan salamis hang from the ceiling of the shop, located off of the main street in Ft. Calhoun. The aroma of meats curing with various herbs and spices fills the 400-square-foot building.

Chad Lebo Keeps Food Traditions Alive at Cure Cooking

By Susan Minichiello    Photography by Ariel Fried

 

Complete a Google search for “heritage breed bacon club” and the first result is Cure Cooking, an Omaha business with the tagline “Keep food traditions alive.”

Cure Cooking offers a variety of heritage breed bacon, pancetta, lard, ham, sausage, smoked ribs, bacon butter and dill pickles. In addition, Cure offers traditional cooking classes, from cheesemaking to fermentation to curing and smoking.

Chad Lebo is owner of Cure Cooking, an Omaha business specializing in cured meats, naturally fermented pickles and homemade cheese.

Owner Chad Lebo makes the bacon with all-natural heritage breed pork from TD Niche Pork in Elk Creek, Nebraska. On any given week, the bacon selection ranges with offerings such as garlic and tarragon English bacon, curry bacon, sweet black pepper bacon and more.

The main difference between Chad’s bacon and grocery store bacon begins with the pork and its flavor. Heritage breed pigs are fed a natural diet without … Read More

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Heritage Turkey

Photo by Trisha Hughes

Yield: 12 servings

18-pound heritage turkey
¼ cup butter, softened
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Kosher salt
Cracked black pepper
¼ cup fresh sage leaves
4 bay leaves
1 lemon, whole
2 cups water

Set oven rack in lowest position and preheat oven to 425°.

Rinse outside of turkey and turkey cavity; pat dry. Slide hand under skin to gently separate skin from the breast meat. Using fingers, coat meat under skin with butter. Lightly baste outside of skin with olive oil and generously season turkey and cavity with salt and pepper. Put sage leaves and bay leaves into turkey cavity. Rinse and dry lemon, then poke holes around with sharp knife; place into turkey cavity.

Place turkey in roasting pan and pour water in the pan, around the outside of the turkey. Tent with foil, place in oven and roast for 30 minutes. Reduce heat to 325° and roast until instant-read thermometer inserted into thickest part of thigh registers 170°, basting with pan drippings every 30 minutes, for approximately 2 to 2½ hours in total.

Let stand 15 minutes before carving.

Recipe developed for Edible Omaha by Julie Kolpin and Mary Oswald

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Vegetable Chips

Photo by Trisha Hughes

Yield: 4 servings

2 large beets
2 large parsnips
2 large potatoes
2 large sweet potatoes
2 small butternut squash, peeled
Vegetable or grape seed oil, beef tallow or lard (enough to be 3 inches deep in a pan or fryer when heated)
Sea salt

Prepare one bowl of salted cold water (1 teaspoon salt per 4 cups of cold water) for each type of vegetable and set aside. Wash the vegetables. Use a mandolin, sharp knife or vegetable peeler to create very thin, uniform slices of each. Place each kind of vegetable in a bowl of salted water for 10 minutes, remove and dry completely.

Heat oil in a large, deep pan over medium-high heat to 300°. When oil is hot, fry the beets, then parsnips, potatoes and squash separately in small batches in the same pan until golden brown and crispy. Remove from oil, drain and sprinkle with sea salt. Serve when cool or store in an airtight container for 2 days.

Recipe developed for Edible Omaha by Julie Kolpin and Mary Oswald.

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Photo by Trisha Hughes

Turkey and Apple Sandwich with Spicy Mustard

Photo by Trisha Hughes

Yield: 1 serving

1 tablespoon butter, softened
2 slices whole-grain bread
2 tablespoons spicy whole-grain mustard
2 thin slices of Granny Smith apple
2 slices leftover heritage turkey, white meat only
3 ounces Brie cheese (can substitute Camembert or Swiss)

Butter one side of each slice of bread and spread the other side with whole-grain mustard. On the mustard side, add slices of apple, turkey and cheese. Top with second slice of bread, mustard-side facing the sandwich ingredients. Place in toaster oven or regular oven at 350° for 15 minutes. Carefully remove from oven and let stand one minute; slice and serve.
Recipe developed for Edible Omaha by Julie Kolpin and Mary Oswald.

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ON THE COVER
Botany separates out true roots (beets, carrots, radishes, parsnips or turnips), but for culinary purposes, we commonly refer to all categories (bulbs, corms, rhizomes and tubers) of underground plants as root vegetables. Great for storage, they are an invaluable source of nutrition, and because they survive cold storage, they are priceless as winter nutrition for those of us in cold climates when little else is growing. Photo by Trisha Hughes

Contents Harvest 2015

 ON THE COVER
Botany separates out true roots (beets, carrots, radishes, parsnips or turnips), but for culinary purposes, we commonly refer to all categories (bulbs, corms, rhizomes and tubers) of underground plants as root vegetables. Great for storage, they are an invaluable source of nutrition, and because they survive cold storage, they are priceless as winter nutrition for those of us in cold climates when little else is growing.
Photo by Trisha Hughes

FEATURES

BACON MAN
Chad Lebo keeps food traditions alive at Cure Cooking

AT LOESS HILLS YOUNG PEOPLE’S FARM
Ensuring a permanent place for sustainable agriculture

DEPARTMENTS

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

EDIBLE EVENTS

SPILLING THE BEANS
Aspiring Chefs Bring Home Their First Gold
Coffee, Community and Culture
Big Win at American Cheese Society Competition
A Family Affair: From Farm to Table

IN SEASON

EDIBLE CHANGE MAKER
A Law That Saves Us All

EDIBLE RHYTHM
The Chore-less Garden

EAT LOCAL GUIDE
Inclusion by Invitation Only

ADVERTISER DIRECTORY

RECIPES

Heritage Turkey
Vegetable Chips
Spicy Carrots, Parsnips and Sweet Potatoes
Turkey Reuben
Turkey and Apple Sandwich with Spicy Mustard
Gingerbread-Apple Bread Pudding

Photo by Trisha Hughes

 

 

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