Archive | Harvest 2016

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The Last Bite

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In 1954, J.I. Rodale, founder of Rodale Institute, wrote “Organics is not a fad. It has been a long-established practice––much more firmly grounded than the current chemical flair. Present agricultural practices are leading us downhill.”

Around the same time, on his farm in Marquette, Nebraska, Don Vetter became one of the earliest adopters of organic farming practices in his area.

In September, some 60 years later, Don’s son, David, accepted the Farm Award at Rodale Institute’s 6th Annual Organic Pioneer Awards, a celebration recognizing one research scientist, one farmer and one business, which are all helping lead the way to an organic planet.

Grain Place Foods, the Vetter’s family business, has employed three generations of Vetters and helps steward other local farms in their journey toward organic production. Their mission is to provide their customers with grain products that are grown and produced in an ecologically sustainable and socially responsible manner––with the conviction that how your food is produced does matter.

Photos courtesy of Rodale Institute

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Photo by Mary Oswald

Bison Pot Roast

Photo by Mary Oswald

Yield: 6 servings

1 (2-pound) bison pot roast (or beef roast)
⅓ cup unbleached flour
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon black pepper
¼ cup grapeseed oil
1 medium yellow onion, diced
3 medium carrots, diced
3 stalks celery, diced
5 cloves garlic, crushed
2 tablespoons tomato paste
4 medium yellow potatoes, cut into 1½-inch pieces
1 cup dry red cooking wine
1½ cups beef stock

Place roast in a large re-sealable plastic bag with the flour, salt and pepper. Shake well to coat and allow to rest in bag for 10 minutes.

Place a thick-bottomed pan or Dutch oven over medium-low heat and warm oil. Once preheated (about 10 minutes) add roast and turn until brown, about 6 minutes per side. Remove from oil and set aside.

Add onions to pan and sauté for 8 to 9 minutes. Stir in carrots and celery and sauté together for another 8 to 9 minutes. Add the crushed garlic and tomato paste, continue to stir and sauté to caramelize all the vegetables.

Return the roast to the pot, add the potatoes, wine and stock. Bring the entire pot to a boil and then immediately reduce to a simmer. … Read More

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Photo by Mary Oswald

Sausage and Potato Soup

Photo by Mary Oswald

Yield: 8 servings

4 cups peeled, uniformly diced white or gold potatoes
4 cups chicken or vegetable stock
1 pound Italian sausage, ground or links, cut into bite-size pieces
1 medium red onion, diced
½ cup diced celery
½ cup shredded carrots
2 cloves crushed garlic
1 cup half-and-half
1 cup shredded Parmesan or other hard cheese
Salt and pepper, to taste

Add diced potatoes and stock to a large stockpot and place over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat to medium-low and simmer for 20 minutes or until the potatoes are fork tender.

While the potatoes are simmering, cook the sausage in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Remove sausage from pan to plate and discard all fat but 1 tablespoon from pan. Add onion, celery, carrots and garlic to skillet and sauté until onions are translucent. Add sausage back into skillet and stir to combine. Remove any excess fat from the mixture.

Transfer the cooked sausage and vegetables to the stockpot with the stock and potatoes. Add half-and-half and cheese, stirring until all ingredients are combined and warmed through.

Optional ideas to sauté with vegetables: 1 cup either chopped kale, … Read More

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Contents Harvest 2016

Photo by Ariel Fried

 FEATURES

The Making of Milkweed Soup

Staying Sane While Feeding Little People

Photo by Mary Oswald

RECIPES

Marinated Carrot Salad
Bison Pot Roast
Caramelized Beets and Onions
Sausage and Potato Soup

DEPARTMENTS

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

EDIBLE EVENTS

SPILLING THE BEANS
A Nostalgic Collection of the Best School Lunch Recipes
Elevating the Sandwich
Fun and Funky Fine Dining
Fresh Doughnuts Daily

IN SEASON

EDIBLE INSPIRATION
Four Dudes Gardening

EAT LOCAL GUIDE

ADVERTISER DIRECTORY

THE LAST BITE
Award Winner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ON THE COVER
Even though carrots are one of the most widely used vegetables, different preparation methods often provoke polarized reactions. Some people love raw carrots but dislike cooked carrots and vice versa. Others love them in all forms, including juice and in cake, although the love of carrot cake may have more to do with cream cheese icing than the carrots themselves. No matter which way you prefer them, this is a great time of the year to enjoy carrots fresh from the field.
Photo by Mary Oswald

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Photo by Mary Oswald

Caramelized Beets and Onions

Photo by Mary Oswald

Yield: 4 servings

1 pound medium beets, trimmed of ends
1 tablespoon butter
1 medium onion, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon pepper

Place beets in a large stockpot and cover with water. Bring to a boil; cover and cook for 35 to 40 minutes or until tender. Drain, reserving 4 tablespoons liquid. Remove beets and cool 10 minutes. Once cool, peel and cut into matchsticks; set aside.

Add butter to a large skillet over medium heat. When melted, add onions and sauté until tender. Add sugar and vinegar to the skillet and stir to combine. Cover and cook for 10 to 15 minutes, stirring frequently, until onions are golden brown.

Remove lid, add beets and stir. Sprinkle salt and pepper on mixture and stir in reserved cooking liquid. Cover and cook for 5 minutes or until heated through. Serve immediately.

––Recipe adapted from Taste of Home

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Photo courtesy of Scratch Baking Company

Fresh Doughnuts Daily

Scratch Baking Company

 

Photo courtesy of Scratch Baking Company

Scratch Baking Company co-owners Anna Wells and Jillian Edmonds met a little over three years ago in Omaha’s Little Italy neighborhood, where they both lived. They knew each other from the Neighborhood Association, but after a weekend trip to IKEA in Kansas City, Anna says they became inseparable.

Last summer, the two sat down and talked about the idea of opening a café. That idea didn’t pan out, but the two still wanted to open a business together. “Early in 2016, I suggested we make doughnuts. It’s an item that we could both get behind,” says Anna. She explains that Jillian has a baking background and went to culinary school to learn how to make pastries. “We started practicing in January and filed for our LLC in February, and it’s been go, go, go from there,” Anna says.

Anna says they use local ingredients as much as possible. Right now, they are purchasing fruit from Little Mountain Farm in Honey Creek, Iowa, and milk through Burbach’s Countryside Dairy in Hartington, Nebraska.

Scratch Baking Company offers seasonal doughnuts in addition to their staple flavors like hazelnut and mojito. Fall flavors include … Read More

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Emily Fink and Jean Heimann <br /> Photo courtesy of Dodge School Favorites

A Nostalgic Collection of the Best School Lunch Recipes

Emily Fink and Jean Heimann
Photo courtesy of Dodge School Favorites

Dodge School Favorites

It all started with nostalgic memories of delicious and comforting food served in the school cafeteria.

Emily Fink, co-author of the book Dodge School Favorites: A Nostalgic Collection of the Best School Lunch Recipes, came up with the idea in early 2015 though a conversation with former classmate and co-author Jean Heimann.

“She said she missed the food we ate when we were in school because when we were in school the lunches were made from scratch by the lunch ladies,” explains Emily, and Jean thought the original recipes were sitting in a box in the school cafeteria somewhere just collecting dust.

This got Emily thinking; so she called a woman named Kate who had worked at the school when Emily and Jean were there. Sure enough, “She said the box was still there. I was shocked,” says Emily. Kate picked up the box and delivered it to Emily’s mom so the next time Emily was in town, she could pick it up.

The oversize shoebox was crammed full of more than 300 recipes. Emily focused her efforts on the recipes closest to the front … Read More

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Austin Regier of Oma’s Deli. Photo by Ariel Fried.

Elevating the Sandwich

Oma’s Deli

Austin Regier of Oma’s Deli. Photo by Ariel Fried.

“We offer soup, salad, sandwiches and small plates. It’s a smaller menu that changes every few days. That means, every time you come in, you can try something different, though we do have some staple items that don’t leave the menu due to customer request,” says Austin Regier, owner and head chef of Oma’s Deli.
Austin opened the deli—named after the German word for grandmother—in December of last year. He chuckles as he explains, “It’s an homage to my roots and to keeping things simple and pure. It’s also a joke for my grandmother. She wanted grandkids but she got a restaurant instead.”
Unsurprisingly, Austin says she didn’t find that funny.
He and his wife had been living in Washington State for the last five years and decided it was time to try something different. Since the economy wasn’t as good on the West Coast, they opted to return home where they had family and connections.
In terms of the food, Austin says Oma’s Deli is wholesome. “We try to take casual fine dining, including presentation, quality of food, execution, thought and energy and apply it to a sandwich. … Read More

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Photo by Ariel Fried

Fun and Funky Fine Dining

Photo by Ariel Fried

Baela Rose

Kyle and Rose Anderson of Baela Rose. Photo by Ariel Fried.

“The idea behind the menu is to create your own tasting, to try two or three different things rather than having a standard entrée,” explains Rose Anderson, co-owner of Baela Rose. Rose runs the Dundee restaurant, which opened in July, with her husband, Kyle, who is the executive chef.

Rose’s restaurant experience includes several years spent as the manager at McKenna’s Blues Booze and BBQ, and Kyle, a graduate of Johnson & Wales, worked at restaurants in Chicago and New York prior to his stint as the executive chef at V. Mertz.

The two met in Dundee several years ago and ended up moving to and opening a sandwich shop in California. Rose says they loved the experience but longed for something more. Specifically, she says they both wanted to open a restaurant.

When the two found out they were expecting, they decided to move back to Omaha where they had the support of family and friends and could give their restaurant idea a go.

Rose and Kyle hope to get customers out of their culinary comfort zone by offering items a bit … Read More

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Photos by Mary Oswald

Marinated Carrot Salad

 

Photos by Mary Oswald

Yield: 4 servings

2 cups water
4 tablespoons white vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt
5 large carrots

Combine water, vinegar, sugar and salt in a small bowl. Stir until sugar and salt are dissolved; set aside.

Peel carrots. With grater or food processor, shred and place into medium bowl. Pour the liquid over shredded carrots and stir to combine. Cover and refrigerate overnight to set flavors. Remove from refrigerator one hour before serving and drain liquid. Serve at room temperature.

––Recipe developed for Edible Omaha by
Julie Kolpin and Mary Oswald

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