Archive | Summer 2016

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Contents Summer 2016

Photo by Alison Bickel

FEATURES

CELEBRATING “RURAL VITALITY”

ELEVATING VILLAGE FOOD CULTURE ONE PLATE AT A TIME

ON THE PLATE

RECIPES

Photo by Mary Oswald

Fresh Fruit Popsicles

Smoked Vegetables

Freezer Corn

Dried Corn

In a Pickle Quick Pickles

DEPARTMENTS

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

EDIBLE EVENTS

SPILLING THE BEANS
Not Just a Meat Shop
Classic Urban Eatery Bistro
A Glass of Produce
Farm-to-Cone Ice Cream Shop

IN SEASON

EDIBLE DIY
Even Kids Can Do It!

EDIBLE INSPIRATION
The Secret Garden: Determination Pays Off

ADVERTISER DIRECTORY

EAT LOCAL GUIDE
Inclusion by Invitation Only

THE LAST BITE
An Extra Serving

FARMERS MARKETS


Photo by Linda Gentry

ON THE COVER

Native to North America, aronia berries, commonly referred to as chokeberries, are drought, pest and disease resistant. The fruit, which grows on a bushy plant, is rich in antioxidants and has been hailed as a superfood. Tart when eaten raw, it can be used in both sweet and savory dishes or found in a variety of products such as salsa, jelly, syrups and even a chili starter.

 

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little-picklers

In a Pickle Quick Pickles

By Amie Petronis Plumley | Photography by Alison Bickel

Yield: About 2 pints of pickles

1 cucumber (or any vegetable you want to pickle)
1 small yellow onion
1½ cups white vinegar
¾ cup sugar
2 teaspoons kosher or pickling salt
1 teaspoon black peppercorns
½ teaspoon celery seeds*
½ teaspoon mustard seeds*

*If you don’t have these spices you can leave them out or use something different like dill weed, turmeric or coriander. If you want spicy pickles, add red pepper flakes, but beware: A little goes a long way! Experiment with spices that your family likes.

Supplies:
Clean jars with lids to hold about 2 pints of pickles
Knife (If you are nervous about having your child use a sharp knife, try slicing the cucumber with a regular table knife or use a vegetable crinkle cutter.)
Cutting board
Measuring spoons
Measuring cup
Whisk
Large measuring cup or bowl with a spout

Wash the cucumber well (you can peel it if you want) and peel the onion. To peel the onion, it sometimes helps to cut a small slit into the top before peeling off the skin.

Chop the cucumber and onion into medium-size chunks or rounds. Pack the … Read More

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Dried Corn

Yield: 6 servings

Kernels cut from 12 ears of corn, blanched (approximately 10 cups)

Oven method:
Preheat oven to 130°. Place kernels on baking sheets in single layer and place in oven. Dry for 10 to 12 hours or until crispy. Cool completely.

Dehydrator method:
Turn dehydrator on to 120°. Spread kernels evenly in a single layer on dehydrator tray(s). Dry 12 to 14 hours until crispy. Cool completely.

Transfer dried corn to an airtight container and store in a cool, dry place for up to 2 months. Eat as a snack or toss on a salad.

—Recipe developed for Edible Omaha by Julie Kolpin and Mary Oswald

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The Secret Garden

Determination Pays Off

By Rachel Plummer | Photography by Ariel Fried

His cheeks are pink from the heat, hands dry with dirt, and his eyes squint from the hot sun peering down on him. Swatting bugs seems to be routine in his steady motion of pulling weeds. Twelve-year-old Ryder Sieh is starting his summer break like every other kid.

Except he has to tend to his garden first.

It all started three years ago with a pocketful of soybean seeds. As Ryder, then nine years old, watched his soybeans grow, the gardener within himself began to blossom. “I picked up soybeans from farmers one year and I planted them,” he says. “So, I ate the soybeans.”

His mother, Tonya O’Shea, told him there was no room in their small yard for a garden. She figured he was just a kid and he would lose interest in the subject like most kids do when they randomly start a hobby. Despite his mother’s orders, Ryder found a spot in the family’s yard to start his small secret garden, which was located in between the gazebo, the shed and the fence. He took corn seeds from the birdfeeder and packets of seeds from … Read More

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Smoked Vegetables

Photos by Mary Oswald

When creating this recipe, we used a variety of tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, bell peppers (no seeds or membranes), red onion, zucchini, broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts and cauliflower. Get creative and use the bounty of the summer. Any combination works!

Yield:8 servings

Wood chips for smoker
4 cups assorted vegetables*, rinsed and cut into large, evenly sized pieces
½ cup extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and pepper, to taste

Prepare smoker with hickory or apple chips and heat to 250°. Line baking sheet(s) with foil. Add vegetables to baking sheets in a single layer and drizzle with oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and stir to coat. Place baking sheets in smoker and close tightly.

Smoke for at least 45 minutes for a lighter flavor or up to 60 minutes for caramelized onions and a deep, smoky flavor, adding wood chips as necessary.

Carefully remove from smoker and cool slightly. If not serving immediately, store in refrigerator for up to one week.

Smoked vegetables can be used in casseroles, salsas or soups, or served alone as a side dish.

Recipe developed for Edible Omaha by Julie Kolpin and Mary Oswald

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