Food for Thought Summer 2016

This spring, three years after planting and patiently waiting, I rejoiced when ready-for-harvest asparagus spears emerged. It’s delightful to harvest a fresh batch for meals, including our Sunday morning frittata with fresh farm eggs compliments of the neighbors. Even better, the asparagus patch produced enough to share with my parents—the very same neighbors who provide with us their bounty of eggs.

I am enamored with adding anything to our land that will reproduce year after year. Right now, I am patiently awaiting the harvest of our first cherries and, in a couple of years, peaches. And this year, for certain, I plan to succeed at harvesting the pears before the deer.

Each of these crops, planted at different times, have distinct needs throughout their life cycle, all essential and varied. First there is planning, then preparing the soil, the actual planting, the waiting and finally the harvest. Along the way, in order to create an ideal environment, protecting from bugs and critters, watering, weeding and fertilizing are all critical. Different phases require different skills and time commitments. Such as it is with business ventures.

After publishing Edible Omaha for nearly five years, Lucy and I recently reflected on our many successes.

During our tenure, we have nurtured a passionate and engaged audience through the work of an incredibly talented team of contributors. We have built a solid business with a loyal advertising base and made deep connections within the local food community, actively participating in hundreds of local food activities. You, our readers, have been an essential part of our success for which we are eternally humbled and grateful.

We have hordes of ideas, multitudes of untapped opportunities and a plan to attain the next level of success, however, Lucy and I have come to terms that due to personal time constraints and gaps in our strengths, we are not best suited to shepherd Edible Omaha into its next phase of life. With a deep desire to keep this valuable resource in our community and after much thoughtful consideration, we have decided to actively seek new owners. This is an awesome opportunity for someone. Much loved by thousands, Edible Omaha is extremely well positioned to broaden its reach as the regional voice for local food and fulfill its mission of building a sustainable food system for our community. If you fancy yourself publishing Edible Omaha, or know of someone who might, please reach out—we’d love to connect!

With much gratitude for your ongoing support,

Amy and Lucy

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